Ellan Read

sometimes witty book reviews

Dream of Ding Village

This book is supremely chilling.

Before AIDS was known to exist, the Chinese local governments set about starting a blood-bank trade in the provinces. Anyone  with a needle, some tubing and a collection bag could take blood. Young people would often give blood up to once every ten days. The industry was an unregulated and corruption rife. Blood money was big for sellers and buyers and swabs and needles were seen by many as reusable items. Almost overnight small, mud hut villages were filled with expensive three story brick houses.

Throughout the village, blood-filled plastic tubing hung like vines, and bottles of plasma like plump red grapes.

Yan’s prose is frank yet still poetic which makes for eerie and often queasy descriptions.  Shockingly, this story is based on real research gathered by Yan over his three years as an anthropologist’s assistant in China (where the book has been banned). The plot is centred around an elder of the Ding Village community, called simply ‘Grandpa,’ watching the younger generation die off one by one a decade after the blood boom. The bones of the dead child narrating the story were once his grandson.

The translation is a bit clunky and the use of metaphors extremely liberal for Western prose, yet Ding Village highlights excruciatingly well the ignorance and  misunderstanding that surrounded AIDS during the epidemic of the late 80s.

Not to be read on swaying public transport or just before an appointment with a medical practitioner (trust me, I know).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on December 15, 2014 by in Bit of Both, China and tagged , , , , .
%d bloggers like this: